How Gas Goes Bad–and Why You Should Care

How Gas Goes Bad–and Why You Should Care

We had our first significant snowfall this weekend, and I hauled the snowblower out to clear off the driveway. Even though it's over ten years old, I knew it would start for a couple of reasons: I set it up for storage at the end of last winter, and I dragged it out and got it started a few weeks back before it got really cold.  There are a few steps to take before putting a gasoline-fueled piece of equipment into storage for a few months, and taking these steps can save money, time, and a lot of frustration. It doesn't take too long to do, and ensures that your equipment will be ready when you need it. From snowblowers to lawnmowers, much of the storage preparation comes down to the gas, because when gasoline sits for a while, it "goes bad". Maybe you have some gas cans in the shed that sit for weeks at a time. Here in New...
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On Eating Raw Beef Liver

On Eating Raw Beef Liver

Even though I know that liver is good for me nutritionally, I don’t really love the taste. I’ve tried frying it and making fancy pates with cognac. No dice. It's alright, but not tasty enough to motivate me to eat it regularly. In looking for a liver recipe, I wanted something easy to prepare that would make liver easier to eat. Then I came across the idea of a raw, grass-fed beef liver smoothie (via RealFoodLiz.com). I was inspired by the novel delivery and the opportunity to really boost my intake of liver, as I figured I could chug a smoothie a few times a week (which I routinely do). I’ve tweaked the recipe over time in pursuit of the most efficient LDS (liver delivery system), and have arrived at something pretty palatable. I’ve given it to folks who are game enough to try a liver smoothie, and they generally say it’s “not bad”. Of course, they are probably expecting it...
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Don’t Be Afraid to Take Things Apart

Don’t Be Afraid to Take Things Apart

One of the toughest things about approaching a project as an amateur repairman can be overcoming a hesitance to take things apart. Every time I push past that, though, I learn something and often am able to complete a repair. As soon as the cover is off the flywheel of the mower engine or the dishwasher's innards are lying on the kitchen floor, the learning begins. I try to time these projects so that when they take longer than expected (as they do), I'm not freaking out, and I do some homework ahead of time. The bottom line is that with some planning, there is a lot to gain from taking things apart and not much to lose. Timing Matters, And Always have a Backup One day, I decided I could replace the rear struts on our 2002 Mazda Protege. A couple of weeks later, I realized that I was correct. It took me a lot longer than I thought it would,...
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